Do You Make these 7 Technology Mistakes with Your Blog?

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technology mistakes

Technology creates great opportunities but also leads to many problems.  We all make technology mistakes but there’s generally time to correct them!

Content Marketing is about providing valuable and useful content to your target audience that will educate, inform and even entertain them!

One good tool for providing this type of content is a blog.

However, there are some technology mistakes that are made with a blog and it’s important you don’t make them!

Here are 7 common technology mistakes.

1.  Ignoring Mobile

An increasing number of your blog visitors are accessing your blog from a mobile device. At the moment 20.42% access RazorSocial from a mobile device.  I have seen this figure close to 30%.

technology mistakes - Mobile visitors to RazorSocial

Mobile visitors to RazorSocial

If your visitors come to your blog via a mobile site for the first time and they don’t have a good experience, will they ever come back?

2.  Not having an RSS Feed

RSS stands for Real Simple Syndication.  It’s a way of formatting your blog content in a standard way which allows many applications to take this content and display it correctly.

I firmly believe that having email subscribers to your blog is far more important than having RSS readers but RSS is still important.

If someone is very active interacting with many blogs they could be valuable people to have reading your blog content.  But, these type of people get far too many e-mails and therefore like to subscribe via RSS.

When they subscribe through RSS this allows them to read your blog content, and every other blog they subscribe to, using one standard program known as an RSS reader.

If you are using WordPress then an RSS feed will automatically be created (http://<website name>>/rss).  If you are using any other blogging platform you should check!

3.  Never recovering your data

At this stage most of us will have some form of backup procedure to back up the content of our blog but have you ever recovered information stored in the backup?

It’s very likely that when you do recover the data not everything you expected to be backed up is backed up.  Just as important as a backup is doing a regular recovery to make sure everything is actually backed up.

4.  Site Speed is too slow

Google penalises a site if it takes too long for your website content to be downloaded. Google wants the best user experience and if takes a minute to view your post then that is not a good user experience.

There are various tools available to test your site’s speed, including a web page test tool provided by Google.  Here is an example of a web page test tool which shows you how long each part of your page takes to load.  This allows you to figure out where the bottlenecks are:

technology mistakes - Website Speed Test

Each part of the web page loaded is displayed with the time to download

5. Assuming your site works on all browsers

You probably use the same internet browser all the time and your site may look perfect on it.  But what about other browsers that your blog visitors are using?

I’m from a technical background and there has been so many times we’ve had software that worked perfect on Firefox and Safari but didn’t work correctly on Internet Explorer.  Internet Explorer is notorious for being non standard and causing issues.

So check to see what browsers your website visitors are using and test these out.

The top 3 browsers for this site is Chrome, Safari and Firefox.  Browser Shots is one application you can use to test your site on many different browsers and versions!

6. Subscription Forms that are not easy to find!

Did you ever read a blog post and think that the blog was interesting but you couldn’t find anywhere to subscribe via e-mail?  This is very common on blog posts.  When I arrive on a page with a blog post the e-mail subscription box should stick out like a sore thumb!

If you make it difficult to subscribe or difficult to find the subscription box then your subscription rate will be much lower.

7. Not Setting up Google Authorship

Google authorship means that you can associate any blog post you write on your site, or any other site, with your picture and Google+ profile.  Google is building up information on you as an author which, over time, will help ranking your posts.

You will also have a benefit of having a picture displayed alongside your blog post in search results.

They are just 7 common technology mistakes.

What is your opinion?  Have you anything you’d like to add?

 




 

About the author

Ian Cleary

Author: Ian Cleary is a technology guy with extensive experience in Social Media. He is a writer for Social Media Examiner and other high profile blogs and is very passionate about Social Media Tools. Ian is the CEO of RazorSocial and also RazorCoast which is a Digital Marketing Agency.

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  • http://www.linguisticatelier.com/ Polish translator Warsaw

    I’ve just set up the authorship so your article confirms it was a good move (still waiting for caching by Google). It’s a pity that I did it after one year of blogging. As regards #3 – I’m afraid such an attempt, if fails, would cost me to lose my data. Any safe way of backing and updating the whole content of the blog? So far so good, so maybe I should leave it as it is?

    • http://www.razorsocial.com/ Ian Cleary

      Hey, I can’t stress the importance of authorship. If you’re a highly ranked author you’ll be in high demand. For recovery you need to backup your data and then recover it on a completely separate machine. For this you should probably get some technical help. I use backup buddy for backups. Thanks for your feedback. Ian

      • http://www.linguisticatelier.com/ Polish translator Warsaw

        You confirmed my concerns. It’s better not to experiment oneself with the backup. So far I used a very primitive way: just export data base and store it locally. And here you’re right – I have no idea to what extent my data base is preserved till the moment I’m forced to use it again. Since I’ve just survived the Mayas end of the world, I won’t be bothering myself with such a tiny detail. Thanks for a prompt reply.

        • http://www.razorsocial.com/ Ian Cleary

          You’re welcome. Glad you survived mayas end of the world!

  • http://www.simplicityadmins.com/ Sarah Santacroce

    Hi Ian, glad to hear you’re using Backup Buddy for backups as well, that’s also what I’m using. I found the process for setting up Google authorship quite complicated to be honest. Not sure if it’s set up right now… Is there a way to check ?

  • http://chrismakara.com/ Chris Makara

    For those concerned with backups of your data, you may want to check with your web host as some offer daily backups of your data to a different server. Of course, there will probably be a surcharge, but it will give you piece of mind knowing there is an automated backup of your data if something should go wrong.

    • http://www.razorsocial.com/ Ian Cleary

      Excellent point Chris, thank you so much for contributing. Ian

  • http://warrenwhitlock.com/social-media-expert Warren Whitlock

    I think these are all MUST HAVEs for bloggers. Any one of them can cause a #fail in your roadmap to a profitable experience. The bit about Authorship might be better to put at the top. This is the thing that will replace search as we know it.

  • http://www.thespicespoon.com/blog/ Shayma

    You won’t believe how many people who have blogs don’t have Google Analytics, Statcounter or Sitemeter, so on and so forth. Astonishing.

    • http://www.razorsocial.com/ Ian Cleary

      Yes you’re right, what’s your favorite analytics tool?

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